Map of German PtG plants

25.04.2019

With Power-to-Gas (PtG) technologies, sustainable electricity can be converted into gas and then stored in the existing gas infrastructure, transported and provided as needed – independent of the natural volatility of wind and solar energy. Forecasts up to 2050 indicate that comprehensive and effective climate protection is not possible without PtG. The “Deutscher Verein des Gas- und Wasserfaches” (German Association of the Gas and Water Sector – DVGW), an independent technical-scientific network for all questions related to gas and water supply, has published an updated map giving an overview of all PtG projects in Germany, including both completed and planned facilities.

The DGWV map shows that the number of PtG plants in Germany as well as their installed capacity is constantly increasing compared to previous statistics. 35 PtG plants are currently in operation with a total capacity of around 30MW. However, most of them are pilot or demonstration projects on a small scale and serve research purposes. Industrial-scale plants are still the exception, also for the 16 projects in planning.

Nevertheless, total PtG capacity will increase significantly in the future (estimated at 273MW), mainly due to two 100MW projects being implemented by two TSCNET shareholders: Amprion, one the four German transmission system operators (TSOs), and the Dutch-German TSO TenneT are pursuing the two most powerful sector coupling projects currently underway in Germany: “hybridge” and “ELEMENT ONE” which are planned at two different sites in the German federal state of Lower Saxony. According to current planning, “ELEMENT ONE” will be gradually operational by 2022 and “hybridge” will be fully operational by 2023.

The German gas and water sector association DVGW has published an upgraded map of PtG facilities in Germany (picture: edited screenshot of video “Power to Gas” by Thyssengas)

Linkup
> See DVGW press release, in German (html)
> Open PtG Plant Map, in German (pdf, 752kb)
> Visit hybridge website, in German (html)
> Visit ELEMENT ONE website, in German (html)

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PtG pilot plants on an industrial scale

29.03.2019

Power-to-Gas (PtG) technologies have the potential to compensate for the weather-related volatility of renewable energies. More specifically, PtG can be used to convert sustainable electricity into gas (green hydrogen or methane), so that the gas infrastructure is additionally available for the transport and storage of electricity from renewable sources. The TSCNET shareholder Amprion, one the four German transmission system operators (TSOs), and TenneT, the Dutch-German TSO, are taking the next important step towards implementing the two most powerful sector coupling projects currently underway in Germany: “hybridge” and “ELEMENT ONE”.

The respective gas transmission partners of Amprion and TenneT are Open Grid Europe for the “hybridge” project and Gasunie and Thyssengas for ELEMENT ONE. Both PTG plants are to convert up to 100MW of electrical power into gas. Their construction is planned at two different sites in the German federal state of Lower Saxony, each close to wind power generation centres and well-developed gas infrastructure.

The grid operators have submitted the necessary investment applications for both projects on 29 March to the Bundesnetzagentur (German Federal Network Agency). If the Agency gives the green light, ELEMENT ONE will be gradually operational by 2022 and hybridge will be fully functional by 2023. Dr. Klaus Kleinekorte, CTO at Amprion, comments on the application, that major PtG projects must now be pushed forward, “if we want to use PtG technology on a large scale in Germany in the 2030s”.

Amprion and TenneT have submitted investment applications for their respective PtG pilot plants hybridge and ELEMENT ONE (picture: Open Grid Europe GmbH)

Linkup
> See Amprion press release, in German (html)
> See TenneT press release, in German (html)
> Visit hybridge website, in German (html)
> Visit ELEMENT ONE website, in German (html)

See article on single page