Smart Grid of the future tested

07.04.2020

Small decentralised power generation plants, storage units and consumers must increasingly take on the role of stabilising the transmission system, a task that has so far been performed mainly by large, centralised power plants. The Dutch-German transmission system operator (TSO), TSCNET shareholder TenneT, is participating in two projects investigating the technical feasibility of decentralised stabilisation options. These two projects are C/sells with a focus on southern Germany and solar energy and enera with a focus on northern Germany and wind energy. Besides TenneT, C/sells and enera comprise various actors from the energy sector, research institutions and distribution system operators (DSOs). Both projects involve regional online platforms for the management of decentralised flexibilities and are funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy in the framework of the innovation programme “Smart Energy Showcases” (“Schaufenster intelligente Energie” – SINTEG).

To connect suppliers and demanders of flexibility, C/sells has developed a flexibility platform called “comax”: Providers of flexibility report existing potential and grid operators can access this potential and coordinate with each other to retrieve their respective needs. In the enera project, a stock exchange-based local flexibility market is being developed that merges supply and demand for flexibility and allocates it to grid operators in a highly efficient manner. By linking the two online platforms of C/sells and enera, the smart grid of the future has now been field-tested and the targeted control of decentralised electricity consumers, storage facilities and generators has been trialled under real conditions throughout Germany for the first time.

During the test run, in coordination with the DSOs involved, the electricity demand of a storage facility in the northern windy state of Lower Saxony was increased at the request of TenneT to absorb electricity from renewable energy sources. At the same time, biogas and CHP (combined heat and power) plants in the south of Germany fed more electricity into the grid to meet the local demand. This has reduced the amount of electricity to be transmitted through the power grid and helped to eliminate bottlenecks.

Tim Meyerjürgens, COO at TenneT, comments on the successful test: “In the future, we will need millions of decentralised systems to stabilise the transmission grid. To this end, grid operators at all levels must collaborate and develop new tools to exploit the potential of CHP plants, heat pumps, biogas plants, battery storage, electric cars, power-to-gas plants and other decentralised facilities for greater grid security. Our test has shown how this works successfully.”

TenneT carried out a successful test on how to use decentralised consumers, storage facilities and generators to stabilise the grid (picture: screenshot taken from the C/sells website)

Linkup
> See TenneT press release, in German (html)
> Visit C/sells website (html)
>Visit enera website, in German (html)